Q and A with Nick Elliott

Q and A with Nick Elliott

Q1. Have you ever stripped off because the person you photographed didn’t feel comfortable being the only one naked? (Cheeky) Emma North Yorkshire.

A1. Yes of course! I always like to put my subjects at ease. I’ve lost my trousers quite a few times on shoots!

Q2. Would you draw the line ethically about taking a shot which was not morally correct, or is it important to capture everything?. Si. Baltimore USA

A2. I think it’s important to capture and record everything that is put before me. There are moments in history caught on film, that are truly shocking but these moments shape the audiences opinions, thoughts, emotions, and awareness. These images build history.

Q3. What is the craziest request that you have had ever said no to during a shoot?. Victoria H. Scotland UK.

A3. I’ve never said no to any request during a shoot. It’s important to accommodate your subjects as much as possible. Although I did turn down Ozzy Osbourne when he asked me to give him my boots!

Q4. How old were you when you lost your virginity, and where? Eva. V Cambridgeshire UK.

A4. I was about 15 years old at the Cambridge Corn Exchange after a Lindsfarne concert. It was a great concert!

Q5. One of the great artists you have had a chance to work with is the one and only Earl Slick… how has your experience been working with him and what have you enjoyed most about it? Cynthia H. Mexico

A5. Earl is a one-of-a-kind individual. A true gentleman and a musical genius. It was an amazing experience to hook up with slick and work with him over the last five years. Slick is an incredibly private person and it was a total challenge to gain his confidence. Slick allowed me to shoot up close and personal and I respected our friendship and the trust that we had developed over the years. We hook up whenever he’s back in the UK, we go on days out together which is always a blast. We appreciate each other’s careers and it’s wonderful to call him of true friend.

Q6. If you were not a rock photographer what vocation would you choose instead?. Claire R. Florida USA

A6. I can’t imagine doing anything else. It runs through me, but if I did have to choose, it would be within the music/creative industry. Probably a radio TV presenter.

Q7. Which photographers have influenced your art? Ernesto S. Italy

A7. There have been many. Anton Corbyn, Terence Donovan, Ansal Adams, Bailey and Maplethorpe just to name a few. I have the greatest respect for all of these artists, their vision and expertise have always influence to me. It has allowed me to develop and explore my own unique style and not be afraid to experiment with light, contrast, content, exposure and subject matter. It’s allowed me to be daring with my art work at a young age and develop as I got older.

Q8. What do you want to say with your images and how do you get them to portray that?. Henry A. Lincoln UK

A8. Each image portrays something different for each individual. I want my heart to be responsible for provoking a range of emotions. I want the audience to find a connection with the images that creates a deeper understanding of themselves. A self awareness that releases their true personality. I would like my art to make people think about what they are viewing.

Q9. What motivates you to continue producing fine art photography? Will B. Norwich UK.

A9. My motivation is driven solely by striving to move the creative line for myself and for the audience. I want to push the boundaries of the photographic art world, for my images to be relevant and thought-provoking even after my death.

Q10. Did you ever climb trees as a boy because Nicholas boys should never climb trees! Delphine Leeds UK

A10. I have had many a fight at school over that comment! I still climb trees and I’m still knickerless, as you would find out if you were in the woods with me!

If you have a question for Nick please send it in to benicebond@icloud.com and we will include them in the next Q&A session. Please note some questions have been shortened.

Ch….Ch….Changes….

Much needed changes taking place at elliottstudios, all in the capable hands of the elliottstudios team, We have transformed the website into a real visual treat. The press office has been replaced with the Nick Elliott Official page, To bring a refreshing new look. And Nick has been very busy updating his portfolio and adding new collections of fine art photographic work many of these images are previously unseen and taken from Nicks personal archival collection..

All One off pieces of fine art.

Hundreds of new images can be viewed in the online shop @ nickelliott.shop

Nick has been working incredibly hard on several conceptual art projects, soon to be showcased in a selection of fine art galleries across the UK, Europe and the USA..

If you can’t get to an exhibition don’t worry, the projects will be released in a sealed XXX fine art book due for release sometime early next year 2021

It really is not for the faint hearted……

“ I would like to wholeheartedly thank everyone at elliottstudios for making the rebranding the best it’s ever been in preparing the whole Nick Elliott brand for a new future.

The rebranding and upgrade of the nickelliott.info website has been a particularly busy time for the elliottstudios team. And Nick would like to thank them all for their tireless commitment and hard work”

Nick Elliott Rock Art photographer.

Pandemic on the Dancefloor…

The COVID-19 Pandemic has derailed the music business causing destructive soundwaves Ripling out and destroying years of music workers livelihoods.

Nick has voiced his concern on the ensuing Pandemic and the long-standing effects it will have on the live music business and his friends within it. “ the Pandemic has ground the U.K.’s multi million pound music business to a halt, causing catastrophic knock on affect to everyone associated within the industry. Not only affecting artists but record labels, independent recording companies, freelancers, venues, festivals and agents. This year could change the face of the music industry for ever”

Nick Elliott Rock Art photographer

Thousands of festivals and tours have been cancelled or postponed leaving creatives and their fans feeling uncertainty for the future. The music and entertainment industry relies on their heavily freelance creative workforce. The loss of their income, usually for completed work only, may force many creatives out of the industry forever. Many talented people could find themselves redeployed into vocations that do not represent their talents, which will be a total loss for the UK’s music industry.

“ I’m particularly worried about the new aspiring musical acts who rely on live music festivals and tours to showcase their talents and get a footing on the music ladder many talented artists may go undiscovered“

The rise of music streaming, virtual live shows, podcasts and FB streaming is encouraging and many have found innovative ways to keep the music live and to keep fans listening.

Nick Elliott Rock Art Photographer

“ I think that once we come out of the other side of this, the music industry will experience a boom. If artists and their associated workers can survive this brief period of hardship there is a potential for the music industry to begin to thrive again as fans flock back to the music scene.

Life without music is like a life without love“

Nick Elliott Rock Photographer

PennyBlackMusic Interview

Media coverage – Pennyblackmusic.co.uk

PenntBlackMusic_interview

Read Dave Goodwin’s interview online

Iconic Photographer Rocks 50 Folk

Media coverage – The Rhythmic Lounge

Rhythmic lounge Feb

50Folk Launches!

50 Folk

It’s been over a year in the making, but we’re now delighted to announce the launch of Nick’s second publication: 50Folk.

This limited edition, fine art, book features a collection of the iconic rock photographer’s favourite images of folk, blues and Americana performers shot during his time working with artists, record labels and major music publications at Cambridge Folk Festival.

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Nick Celebrates Cambridge Folk Festival At 50

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Avid readers of Nick’s news room may already know that Nick has been involved with the Cambridge Folk Festival since 2000, working at the festival with various clients and also using it as the subject for his debut book: TEN-A Decade In Images.

This year, the legendary festival reached 50 fabulous years and Nick was once again on site to participate in the celebrations and photographically record the occasion.

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The Collections

We have a bit of a treat for you in the making.

We’re launching a series of new videos entitled The Collections, which showcase a selection of Nick’s wonderful images against a backdrop of original music courtesy of some specially invited artists.

The first previews a collection of images from Nick’s debut book, TEN – A Decade In Images, featuring artists from the last decade of the Cambridge Folk Festival.

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Magnificent Mark

Continuing our TEN-A Decade In Images week in the run up to the Cambridge Folk Festival, here is what the BBC’s Mark Radcliffe has to say about it:

‘These warm and evocative photographs perfectly capture the intimacy and authenticity of a warm, evocative, inimate and authentic event. As I look through them I am anticipating going back to Cherry Hinton with even more delight than usual. I was tempted to say that if you wanted to know what Cambridge Folk Festival was like then these pictures say it all but that would be stupid. You have to listen to the music of course. But while we wait for that to happen again in July, these photos whet the appetite splendidly’. Mark Radcliffe

Marvellous Mike

Continuing our TEN-A Decade In Images week in the run up to the Cambridge Folk Festival, here is what ‘Mr Folk’, Mike Harding, has to say about it:

A great book of photographs from one of the greatest folk festivals in the world. As a fellow photographer I am more than a little jealous of Nick’s work. His images capture the atmosphere of many, many magic moments.” Mike Harding